The onslaught of the Ebola virus in several West African nations is certainly cause for concern, and is receiving due attention from The World Health Organization and other international governing bodies, but it should be noted that business has been largely unaffected throughout much of the continent. While never wanting to understate a situation that has proven deadly, it has been primarily contained within the borders of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Flights continue to fly on schedule both in and out of countries such as Nigeria, South Africa, Morocco, Algeria, Zambia and Namibia and the other countries as well. It’s always important to keep an even keel when evaluating situations that can have such a profound impact on an entire continent’s economic well being.

On a related note, businesses in the United States are committing an investment of $14 billion U.S. dollars across the continent of Africa in an effort to expand relations. The primary areas of focus of the investment will include: banking, clean energy, construction and information technology projects. This is a tremendous opportunity and will greatly benefit the GDP of participating nations.

South Sudan Minister of Finance Aggrey Sabuni Tisa is urging the country to diversify its economic base so that it collects more revenues from sources other than oil as he presented the 2014-15 budget to lawmakers this week. He knows well of what he speaks. Yes, oil brings in the lion’s share of South Sudan’s revenues, and the government expects it to bring in 8.9 billion South Sudanese pounds in revenue this fiscal year, or nearly 80% of the £11.3 billion budget and that is a serious concern. Finding alternate means of developing a nation’s economy is always a strong insurance plan, should the primary source go through a dry period.

In this issue
we take a look at some of Africa’s brightest enterprises in different business sectors including: healthcare, mining, finance, agriculture, retail and construction.


Angus Gillespie